by Member's Mark |
Item # 980134756
|
Model # 701760 |

Product Details

Why We Love This

A perfect meal for cold fall and winter nights, this satisfying soup is loaded with strips of cage-free chicken, veggies and real crushed tortilla chips in every spoonful.

About this item

  • Made with cage free chicken and real chicken stock
  • Chicken tortilla soup, ready to heat and eat
  • Gluten and lactose free
  • No artificial colors, flavors or preservatives
  • Good source of protein
Sam's Exclusive
Select a club for price and availability
Pick it up
Select a club

Description

Members Mark® Chicken Tortilla Soup (2 pk.) can warm you up on a cold winter night or be a tasty delight on a summer evening. Just microwave a bowl of this satisfying, hearty soup and enjoy.

What Is in Member's Mark Chicken Tortilla Soup?

Loaded with strips of chicken and vegetables, this chicken tortilla soup delivers an authentic, bold flavor in every spoonful. Packed with healthy ingredients, this tortilla soup is made with cage-free chicken, roasted corn, tender black beans, colorful bell peppers, vine-ripened tomatoes and real crushed tortilla chips. All that goodness is slow-simmered in a handcrafted chicken stock and finished with a touch of lime and chipotle sauce.

On a busy night, opt for this easy chicken tortilla soup, ready to heat and eat.

How Healthy Is Member's Mark Chicken Tortilla Soup?

Read the label, and you'll find this soup is chock-full of vegetables and recognizable ingredients you could expect to find in any homemade chicken tortilla soup recipe, with no artificial colors, flavors or preservatives. At eight grams of protein per cup, this soup is a good source of protein.

The chicken in this soup is hormone- and antibiotics-free. In addition, this soup is gluten-free and lactose-free.

History of Chicken Tortilla Soup

A number of different theories have arisen about the origin of chicken tortilla soup, or alternatively, chicken taco soup. Some believe the dish, called sopa Azteca in Mexico, originated in Mexico City, where it is still popular. Others trace it to Central Mexico. That theory is supported by Diane Kennedy, a chef who's an authority on Mexican cuisine. She shared a tortilla soup recipe in one of her cookbooks, pointing out that it's common in Central Mexico. According to food historians, the soup made its way north to California by the mid-20th century.

Member reviews & questions